Welcome to Astronomy & Telescope Astronomy

 
 

  Modules

· Home
· AvantGo
· Content
· Downloads
· Encyclopedia
· FAQ
· Feedback
· Forums
· Journal
· Members List
· Private Messages
· Recommend Us
· Reviews
· Search
· Statistics
· Stories Archive
· Submit News
· Surveys
· Top 10
· Topics
· Web Links
· Your Account
 

  Who's Online

There are currently, 10 guest(s) and 0 member(s) that are online.

You are Anonymous user. You can register for free by clicking here
 

  Search



 

  Languages

Select Interface Language:

 

  Random Headlines


Deep Sky Observing
[ Deep Sky Observing ]

·Astronomy: Deep Sky Observing - THE WEBB SOCIETY
·Astronomy: Deep Sky Observing - RECORDING METHODS
·Astronomy: Deep Sky Observing - OBSERVING TIPS
·Astronomy: Deep Sky Observing - HOW BRIGHT
·Astronomy: Deep Sky Observing - DEEP-SKY CATALOGS
·Astronomy: Deep Sky Observing
 

 
  Moon: Astronomy: Moon - Moon Rotation
Posted on Saturday, December 04 @ 16:10:56 CST by astronomy
 
 
  Moon

MOON-ROVING

"Tides" raised in the rocky body of the Moon by Earth's gravity have caused the Moon to rotate on its axis in exactly the same time as it takes to orbit Earth. This is why the same side is always turned toward us.



As it orbits, the Moon shows a varying amount of its illuminated face because the angle between the Sun, Earth, and itself changes. These variations are called phases.

While Full Moon has its attractions, the best time to explore the Moon's cratered surface with a telescope is when sunlight strikes it at a shallow angle, creating long shadows and throwing the features into sharp relief. This happens twice a month for about a week at a time, centered on the dates of the First and Last Quarter phases.

Start with the lowest magnification your telescope has and slowly increase the power as on feature of another catches your eyes. If the view grows blurry, drop back in power. Identify any large dark maria you can see, and use them as a guide to take you farther. You will see the most details near the terminator-the dividing line between the illuminated and dark portions of the moon.

 
 
  Login

Nickname

Password

Don't have an account yet? You can create one. As a registered user you have some advantages like theme manager, comments configuration and post comments with your name.
 

  Related Links

· More about Moon
· News by astronomy


Most read story about Moon:
Astronomy: Moon - OBSERVING THE MOON

 

  Article Rating

Average Score: 0
Votes: 0

Please take a second and vote for this article:

Excellent
Very Good
Good
Regular
Bad

 

  Options


 Printer Friendly Printer Friendly

 Send to a Friend Send to a Friend

 

 
 
Associated Topics

Moon
 
 


 
 
"Login" | Login/Create an Account | 0 comments
The comments are owned by the poster. We aren't responsible for their content.
 
 


 
 
No Comments Allowed for Anonymous, please register
 
 


 
  Astronomy & Telescope Astronomy

All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner. The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © 2004 by Astronomy & Telescope Astronomy
You can syndicate our news using the file backend.php or ultramode.txt